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  LiveWire / Teen Forums / Mental Health & Emotional Support / Viewing Topic

Eating Disorder FAQ.
Replies: 0Last Post Oct. 2, 2008 9:37am by Annastasia
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What Is An Eating Disorder?

"Eating disorder" is when a person eats, or refuses to eat, in order to satisfy a psychic need and not a physical need. The person doesn't listen to bodily signals or perhaps is not even aware of them. A normal person eats when hungry and stops eating when the body doesn't need more, when he feels the signal of satisfaction.
Eating disorders are usually classified as anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder in accordance with the symptoms. However, a person may have an eating disorder without belonging exactly to any of these categories.


What Is EDNOS?

According to the DSM-IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders), there is a classification of disordered eating that falls outside of the criteria for Anorexia, Binge Eating and Bulimia. This category is referred to as "EDNOS", or "Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified." These are also sometimes referred to as 'sub-clinical' or 'sub-threshold' disorders.
Those who lose weight because of illness, e.g., cancer, are not considered to have an eating disorder.

More information on EDNOS can be found at this location.

Anorexia Nervosa


Anorexia nervosa is a serious, occasionally chronic, and potentially life-threatening eating disorder defined by a refusal to maintain minimal body weight within 15 percent of an individual's normal weight. Other essential features of this disorder include an intense fear of gaining weight, a distorted body image, denial of the seriousness of the illness, and amenorrhea (absence of at least three consecutive menstrual cycles when they are otherwise expected to occur).
Conservative estimates suggest that one-half to one percent of females in the U.S. develop anorexia nervosa. Because more than 90 percent of all those who are affected are adolescent and young women, the disorder has been characterized as primarily a woman's illness. It should be noted, however, that males and children as young as seven years old have been diagnosed; and women 50, 60, 70, and even 80 years of age have fit the diagnosis. Some of these individuals will have struggled with eating, shape or weight in the past but new onset cases can also occur.


What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
DSM-IV Diagnostic Criteria
Physical, Emotional and Behavioral Symptoms and Red Flags
Anorexia Nervosa Symptoms.
Warning Signs and Symptoms Of Anorexia Nervosa.

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatment including medication and psychotherapy
Treatment Overview

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Medical Complications
Medical Problems Anorexia Can Cause


Bulimia Nervosa


Bulimia, also called bulimia nervosa, is a psychological eating disorder. Bulimia is characterized by episodes of binge-eating followed by inappropriate methods of weight control (purging). Inappropriate methods of weight control include vomiting, fasting, enemas, excessive use of laxatives and diuretics, or compulsive exercising. Excessive shape and weight concerns are also characteristics of bulimia. A binge is an episode where an individual eats a much larger amount of food than most people would in a similar situation. Binge eating is not a response to intense hunger. It is usually a response to depression, stress, or self esteem issues. During the binge episode, the individual experiences a loss of control. However, the sense of a loss of control is also followed by a short-lived calmness. The calmness is often followed by self-loathing. The cycle of overeating and purging usually becomes an obsession and is repeated often.
Bulimia affects about 10% of college age women in the United States. About 10% of individuals diagnosed with bulimia are men. 10% of individuals suffering from bulimia will die from either starvation, cardiac arrest, other medical complications, or suicide.


What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
DSM-IV Criteria for Bulimia Nervosa
Bulimia Signs and Symptoms
Bulimia Nervosa Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
How Bulimia Nervosa is Treated
Treatment Overview

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Medical Problems
Medical Consequences


Purging Disorder


Purging disorder is a newly recognized disorder in which people of normal or below average weight purge after eating, often by vomiting.  Other purging methods include the use of laxatives to speed the passage of food through the digestive system so less of it is absorbed by the body and the use of diuretics to rid the body of water weight.  It differs from bulimia nervosa because with bulimia, people binge before purging.  People with purging eating disorder do not binge.  People with bulimia may also fast and/or exercise excessively to compensate for the large amounts of food that they eat, and people with purging eating disorder don't do that.  According to Anorexia Nervosa and Related Eating Disorders, Inc., purging eating disorder may be more common than anorexia and bulimia combined.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Possible Signs of a Purging Disorder
Purging Disorder Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatments For Purging Disorder
How to Cope With an Eating Disorder

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Medical Risks of Purging Disorder
Medical Consequences of Eating Disorders

Binge Eating


People with binge eating disorder frequently eat large amounts of food while feeling a loss of control over their eating. This disorder is different from binge-purge syndrome (bulimia nervosa) because people with binge eating disorder usually do not purge afterward by vomiting or using laxatives. Most people with binge eating disorder are obese (more than 20 percent above a healthy body weight), but normal-weight people also can be affected. Binge eating disorder probably affects 2 percent of all adults, or about 1 million to 2 million Americans. Among mildly obese people in self-help or commercial weight loss programs, 10 to 15 percent have binge eating disorder. The disorder is even more common in those with severe obesity.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Symptoms
Signs and Symptoms
Symptoms

Are There Treatments Available?
Treatments
Treatments and Drugs

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Medical Complications
Medical Complications
Medical Complications


Orthorexia Nervosa


Orthorexia, or orthorexia nervosa is a term coined by Steven Bratman, a Colorado MD, to denote an eating disorder characterized by excessive focus on eating healthy foods. In rare cases, this focus may turn into a fixation so extreme that it can lead to severe malnutrition or even death.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Symptoms
Symptoms
10 Possible Signs

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatments

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Risks/Complications


Muscle Dysmorphic Disorder/Bigorexia


Bigorexia is a body dysmorphic disorder in which someone believes that no matter how much he or she works out, he or she will never be muscular enough. The technical term for bigorexia is "muscular dysmorphia," reflecting the fact that the focus of people who suffer from this condition is the muscles, but people also call it "reverse anorexia" or "bigorexia" because the condition involves growing as large as possible, rather than trying to get as small as possible, as is the case with anorexia. Most bigorexia patients are men, reflecting a male beauty standard which places a heavy emphasis on being well-muscled, although women can suffer from this condition as well.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Signs and Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Recognition and Treatment
Treatment

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Risks/Implications


Compulsive Exercising/Anorexia Athletica


A person suffering from anorexia athletica exercises for an amount of time or an intensity that is beyond normal. This person will exercise compulsively in an attempt to control weight in a misguided attempt to gain a sense of power, control, and self-respect. Most sufferers of this condition, like anorexia nervosa are female and between the ages of 12 and 19. They do not "enjoy" exercise, but feel obligated to exercising. They may feel a sense of guilt and even anxiety when they miss a work out. Almost nothing will prevent the suffer from fulfilling the need for exercise.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Symptoms
Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatment
Treatments

Medical Consequences/Implications
Medical Complications


Night-Eating Syndrome


Night Eating Syndrome is a condition characterized by a lack of appetite for breakfast; the consumption of more than 50 percent of daily calories after the evening meal, and waking up, at least, once a night to consume high-carbohydrate snacks and insomnia. Foods eaten during the nighttime binge are often high caloric in content and unhealthy. After the night binge, the person is usually not hungry in the morning. During the nighttime, individuals with night eating syndrome have a decrease in the hormone that accompanies sleep, melatonin. Researchers believe that the decrease in melatonin contributes to their sleep disturbances.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Symptoms
Causes and Symptoms
Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatment (bottom)

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Risks/Complications (bottom of page)


Pica


Pica is a term that refers to cravings for substances that are not foods. Materials consumed by patients with pica include dirt, ice, clay, glue, sand, chalk, beeswax, chewing gum, laundry starch, and hair. Pica is most common in people with developmental disabilities, including autism and mental retardation, and in children between the ages of 2 and 3. Although kids younger than 18 to 24 months can try to eat non-food items, it isn't necessarily considered abnormal at that age.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
DSM-IV Symptoms and Diagnosis
Signs and Symptoms
Signs and Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatment
Treatment and Help. (bottom of page)

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Dangers
Complications


Sleep Eating Disorder (SED-NOS)/Nocturnal Sleep-Eating Disorder


Similar to nocturnal eating syndrome, sleep eating disorders include sleep disruption, sleep eating, and sometimes even binging and purging without waking up. Sleep eating disorders are different from nocturnal eating syndrome in one main way: nocturnal eating syndrome involves full recall the following day. It's an eating syndrome that is connected with insomnia. In contrast, sleep eating disorders appear not to be related to insomnia. Sleep eaters are becoming more common, and sleep eating disorders are becoming more researched.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Characteristics
Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatment (bottom)
Diagnosis and Treatment

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Complications
Risks/Complications


Prader-Willi Syndrome


Prader-Willi syndrome is a complex genetic condition that affects many parts of the body. In infancy, this condition is characterized by weak muscle tone (hypotonia), feeding difficulties, poor growth, and delayed development. Beginning in childhood, affected individuals develop an insatiable appetite and chronic overeating (hyperphagia). As a result, most experience rapid weight gain leading to obesity. People with Prader-Willi syndrome typically have mental retardation or learning disabilities and behavioural problems. Chief symptom is an implacable drive to eat constantly that will not be denied. While people with normal appetites will get the feeling of being full and unable to eat anymore food, sufferers of Prader-Willi Syndrome fail to get that feeling and will continue to eat.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Characteristics
Symptoms
Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Treatments and Drugs
Treatments
Treatment

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Complications
Complications List  

Diabulimia


Diabulimia is an eating disorder in which people with type 1 diabetes deliberately give themselves less insulin than they need for the purpose of weight loss.  When insulin is omitted, calories are purged through the loss of glucose in the urine. Individuals with diabulimia manipulate insulin as an inappropriate behaviour to prevent weight gain. This is one of the criteria of bulimia nervosa.1 Clinicians have not defined the frequency and duration of insulin omission and many do not recognise this dual condition as a disorder. Some propose the following definition: an insulin reduction at least twice a week or of over one quarter of the prescribed insulin for the purpose of weight loss for more than three months.

Diabulima:  What it is and how to treat it
Diabulima Wikipedia overview
The danger of diabulimia

Rumination disorder


Rumination disorder may be diagnosed when a person deliberately brings food back up into the mouth and either re-chews and re-swallows it or spits it out. Rumination disorder is sometimes called merycism. It is a disorder most commonly found in infants, and associated with mental retardation.

What Are The Symptoms/Characteristics?
Symptoms
Causes and Symptoms
Symptoms

What Are The Treatments Available?
Diagnosis and Treatment
Treatment and Prognosis (bottom)
Treatment

What Are The Medical Consequences/Implications?
Associated Problems
Complications
Associated Complications

Gourmand syndrome


Gourmand syndrome is a rare, benign condition that sometimes occurs in people who sustain injuries to the right frontal lobe (section of the brain). These people develop a new, post-injury passion for gourmet food. It was first described by Regard and Landis in the journal Neurology. This often causes great financial distress, thus leading to other psychological problems.

Gourmand Overview


Bulimirexia/ Purging anorexia


Bulimirexia is a combination of both anorexia and bulimia. It is an eating disorder like its counterparts in which the subject alternates between periods of starvation and periods of "binging and purging" to achieve weight loss. Also like other similar disorders, bulimirexia also takes a great mental toll on its subjects. Sometimes including great fear of weight gain and perverse self-evaluation.

Post edited at 9:22 am on Aug. 22, 2010 by roflfuckyou

-------
if ever we meet on your side of the stereo,
I will pretend I know not of your flaws,
or even the way that they mirror my own.


9:37 am on Oct. 2, 2008 | Joined: June 2005 | Days Active: 1,110
Join to learn more about Annastasia District Of Columbia, United States | Straight Female | Posts: 2,334 | Points: 34,788
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